Friday, April 18, 2014

Knee Deep in Easter Eggs


Onion Skin Easter Eggs | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
My grandmother taught me how to dye
Easter eggs with onion skins. 
With the advent of social sharing sites such as Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, there are too many different ways to serve up Easter eggs. I used to buy one extra dozen eggs for the holiday. That dozen was used to propagate the egg dying tradition we thrust upon our children at a very early age. We bought into the commercialism and purchased egg-dying kits with stickers and shrink wrap. Yesterday, I purchased three dozen eggs and will probably run out before Easter dinner is served. I'm now convinced chickens hired social media marketing experts to drive up egg sales. 
Easter Egg Bread | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
To create an Easter egg loaf, you have to
dye raw eggs in the fridge and hope
your boys don't smash them with
a half-full pizza delivery box.

With my three dozen, I planned on making some Easter egg loaves for friends. The loaves require dyed raw eggs. The eggs get cooked in the oven while the bread bakes. My plan was to dye some eggs for the bread and then dye another half dozen for the benefit of the Easter bunny. That would leave some for baking and breakfasts. My boys are too old to sit around the table and dye eggs--or so I assumed. 
PAAS is tradition | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Egg dying kits--a tradition
my young adult children
have not quite outgrown.

My 20-year-old texted me a few hours after I bought the eggs. He wanted to know; when are we dying eggs this year? I explained that I planned to do it while they were enjoying their all-day fishing excursion. He explained he was out buying egg-dying supplies, and; should he pick up eggs? I told him about my egg purchase. He was thrilled. As for me, his inquiry meant I needed to boil more than half a dozen eggs. He came home with not one, but two egg-dying kits. Evidently he was expecting the family egg dying tradition to be resurrected this year, despite our boys' ages and my lack of grandchildren.
Easter deviled eggs | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Success with a Pinterest idea means
new traditions and more dyed eggs.

In addition to dying raw and hard boiled eggs, I set a precedence last year I have now come to regret. Rather than simply make plain deviled eggs, I mastered Easter deviled eggs. My family absolutely loved the Pinterest-worthy, colorful, tasty eggs. To make Easter deviled eggs, one must peel the boiled eggs and then dye them. 

To be perfectly honest, all this dying seems like overkill now that we get all our eggs from friends who raise free-range, vegetarian-fed chickens. The eggs naturally come in a variety of pretty colors. But thanks to our creativity and tradition over the years, as well as all the great ideas online, my family has come to expect brightly colored eggs in all aspects of our Easter celebrations. 
Nature's Colored Eggs | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Mother Nature really does a great
job coloring eggs already.


Well done, chickens. Your social media marketing worked. I will probably have to buy another dozen. And that's assuming no one will want eggs for breakfast. 


Micki Bare, mother of three, wife, daughter & writer is the author of Thurston T. Turtle children's books. 
Email: mickibare (at) gmail.com
Connect with Micki on Google+
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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Travel Feet: Romantic Mountain Getaway


While my wanderlust gene is dominant and Hubby's is recessive, as a couple, we still need to get away together. I've been able to convince Hubby we need to go on adventures together every now and again. We need to travel to new places. It was a difficult sell. Not only is he more of a homebody, he was worried about the exorbitant price tags associated with travel.
Highway Feet | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
One of the best parts of a romantic couple
getaway is Hubby does most of the driving.

We have budgetary restrictions, due to most of our money being sucked away by the vortex that is being a parent. Whether you are paying for child care or college tuition, whether you are stocking closets or the fridge, your wallet was hijacked at the birth of your first child. I've heard rumors of parents regaining control of their own money when their youngest becomes gainfully employed, but I also know it is not wise to pin hopes on hearsay.

To ensure our bank account would not bleed to death, we put a 300-mile restriction on our romantic getaways. We can easily drive to many interesting destinations within 300 miles or less from home. It takes a mere half a tank of gas to get 300 miles away. And we live in the Southeast, so if we stay away from the major metro areas, which are not all that major compared to New York, LA, or Vegas, we can find relatively inexpensive overnight accommodations.

Sensing I had Hubby's attention with my argument, I took the initiative to plan our first getaway. Jonesborough, TN was barely within the 300 miles, but I kept to our limits and found a great little B&B.

Hubby did most of the driving, which was a nice change of pace for me. Typically, I'm the one going here or there, which means I'm behind the wheel. I rather enjoyed taking in the scenery as we made our way through the mountains toward Jonesborough.

Cozy Fireside Feet | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Who needs a television when you have a
cozy fire, your hubby, and no interruptions?
The B&B was charming and cozy. You can read more about it in the April issue of Asheboro Magazine (pp. 27-30). The fact that we could hang out in our room without fear of a child knocking in search of car keys or a mother calling out in need of a fresh lightbulb on her side of the house made it luxurious. Quiet moments on the porch sipping wine and watching the clouds roll by as the horses and llama grazed in the field below were priceless. And our hosts never once called out to us, "What's for supper?" 


Couple Getaway Feet | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
 Two sets of #TravelFeet are
always better than one.
On our trip, we discovered there are sushi restaurants as far inland as the western side of the Appalachian Mountains. We also made a pact to only eat sushi when we're within a few hundred miles of the coast. We had the opportunity to hear a real, live storyteller in the storytelling capital of the world. And, we consumed one of the best pizzas we've ever tasted after trusting the pizza maker to pick out our toppings.

The best part of the trip was simply spending time hanging out with each other. Some of our future getaways will be day trips. Some will be overnighters. The amount of time doesn't really matter as long as we continue planning adventures for two. 

And you never know. Wanderlust might be contagious. If it is, Hubby will eventually become just as infected as his gypsy wife.


Micki Bare, mother of three, wife, daughter & writer is the author of Thurston T. Turtle children's books. 
Email: mickibare (at) gmail.com
Connect with Micki on Google+
Like Thurston T. Turtle on Facebook
Follow Micki on Twitter: @TurtleAuthor
View Micki's pics on Instagram @mickibare

Monday, April 14, 2014

Colors of Spring


As the pollen drifts downward, coating our cars, homes, and outdoor furniture, tissues are a hot commodity. Allergies are in full bloom. But it is difficult to hold a grudge against Mother Nature, especially when she is busy painting her earthly canvas with the brilliant colors of spring. After a cold, dismal winter, the colors are a welcome sight, assuming you can see through watery, red eyes. If it's too much on your sinuses to get out and walk amongst the flora of the season, put down that box of tissues and scroll through this virtual tour of the blossoms around my place. 

Purple Phlox | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Our Purple Phlox love to creep
down the hill on which they were planted.

Red Tulip | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
The Red Tulip leaves have begun to curl.

Red & Yellow Tulip | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
The multi-color Red and Yellow Tulips
look like fire this year.

Common Blue Violets | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Lots of wild Common Blue Violets
pop up during the first weeks of spring.

Pink Dogwood | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
The Pink Dogwoods are beautiful against
the North Carolina blue sky background.

White Dogwood | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
White Dogwood petals warmly replaced
the snow flurries of winter.

Yellow Daffodils | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Our Daffodils are done blooming, but
we enjoyed their sunny welcome to spring.
Micki Bare, mother of three, wife, daughter & writer is the author of Thurston T. Turtle children's books. 
Email: mickibare (at) gmail.com
Connect with Micki on Google+
Like Thurston T. Turtle on Facebook
Follow Micki on Twitter: @TurtleAuthor
View Micki's pics on Instagram @mickibare