Friday, April 6, 2018

Downtime in the Fairy Room


As I settle into my new routine, which was driven by the start of my career reboot as director of marketing & community engagement and outreach — not only is that a mouthful, it creates the need for magnifying glasses to read my business card — I discovered something awesome about Fridays.
Mother Nature | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Mother Nature by my
awesome mom, Ella Schramm


Hubby typically rolls in about an hour and 45 minutes after I'm done with work for the week. That means, to start my weekend, I have a solid hour and a half of downtime before he arrives home.

During that hour, I can write, read or even take a nap. And for those preciously important activities, I have the perfect venue — my fairy room. 

The room is actually a sunroom, or for my northern relatives a three-season room, over which Hubby gave me complete decorative control. 

My inspiration comes from one of my mother's amazing cloth dolls. My mom, for those who don't know, is an amazing artist who created many beautiful cloth dolls that adorn not only our house, but those of relatives and friends who were fortunate enough to receive such dolls as gifts over the years. 

But I digress. 

My mom's Mother Nature doll was already in the sunroom. Mother Nature seemed to want to live in an enchanted forest. And in that forest, she longed for the companionship of fairies, butterflies and other mystical woodland creatures. 

Or maybe that was me channeling my needs through a doll.

Either way, I have begun my collection of fairies. They all reside in the sunroom with various enchanted forest and fairy garden accessories. Once I began collecting items for the room, I had a place for the love tree paintings that Hubby and I created at The Preppy Possum

And this is the warm, inspirational, relatively quiet place to which I retreat at the end of a productive week. It's where I can recap experiences, like visiting local farm where sheep are herded by beautiful Border Collies. 




Or where I can get lost in a book. Or write. 

I absolutely love my new job. And I adore walking home on a Friday afternoon and chillaxing amongst the mystical matriarchs of my sunroom.

Micki Bare, mother of three, wife, daughter & marketing director is the author of Thurston T. Turtle children's books and an aspiring novelist. 
Email: mickibare (at) gmail.com
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Copyright 2018 Michele Bare

Friday, March 23, 2018

All neighborhoods need an ocean


When we visit the coast, we walk. We mosey along the beach enjoying the sound of the breaking waves and browsing the shells the ocean has spit onto the shore.

We walk in the morning glow of sunrise, watching rays of light bounce off of the sea in glittery reflective sparkles. We walk after lunch and again after supper — especially if we shared a slice of decadent chocolate cake.




We walk to the pier and back. Sometimes we take the time to walk the length of the pier and observe the regulars as they pull croakers and stingrays from the water.




At home, we think we're doing great if we carve out 20 minutes a couple of times a week to walk the dogs around the block. 

That's why, I believe we should design neighborhoods with oceans. Understandably, they'd have to be much smaller than oceans that occur naturally in the wild. Even so, I believe artificial mini-oceans are the key to combating obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol and heart disease. 

Stay with me. I've been to Wet -N- Wild/Emerald Pointe. Well, not recently, but when I was there 30+ years ago, they had a wave pool. We were able to ride our rafts from the center of the pool right up to the concrete "beach" where the waves dissipated. 

Now, if we had the technology and engineering to create wave pools 30+ years ago, we have what it would take to create mini-oceans with sandy beaches, tides and even some seashells. 

These mini-oceans need to be big enough to support at least one fishing pier with a restaurant and arcade. 
Apache Pier Myrtle Beach | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Apache Pier, Myrtle Beach, S.C.

Think about it. If such a water feature was within walking distance from your house, wouldn't you do a lot more walking? And fishing? And skee-ball playing?


I'm telling you, ocean-centric neighborhoods are the wave of the future (pun absolutely intended). It's what we need for a healthier, happier America. 

Micki Bare, mother of three, wife, daughter & marketing director is the author of Thurston T. Turtle children's books and an aspiring novelist. 
Email: mickibare (at) gmail.com
Connect with Micki on Google+
Like Thurston T. Turtle on Facebook
Follow Micki on Twitter: @TurtleAuthor
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Copyright 2018 Michele Bare

Monday, March 20, 2017

The Signal



The Signal is at least as old as the phone | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
The Signal between parents and teens
is at least as old as the invention of the phone.
In a FaithIt.com post recently shared by a Facebook friend, a brilliant new way for parents to keep teens safe developed by Minister Bert Fulks was discussed. And while brilliant appropriately describes the idea, it is not at all new. 

What is new is the technology used to implement the system, which I like to call The Signal. 

How it works

Basically, parents create an understanding, whether through a texted code, such as the "x" used in the post, or a word or conversation that signals the parent to do two things. 

1. Immediately rescue the teen from an uncomfortable or unsafe situation. 

2. Spare the child grief or embarrassment among his or her peers by shifting the blame to the parents.

The system works because teens have an innate need to roll their eyes and declare, "I can't. My dumb parent's won't let me."

Why it works

The system is brilliant because it fosters open communication and a sense of camaraderie between parents and their teens. 

It's critical because it gives teens an escape route for situations in which they feel threatened, unsafe, uncomfortable or simply dislike.

Yes, disliking an activity and feeling bored are perfectly good reasons to initiate The Signal system. That's part of the agreement and a key to making it work — the teen is allowed to use The Signal system for any reason. 

Once the parent receives the agreed upon signal, the parent must intervene and take the heat. It's a promise the teen will come to depend on and appreciate.

Historical proof

My siblings and I had a similar arrangement with my parents when we were teens, well before cell phones. We'd just tell our peers we had to check in — call home from the hosts phone or a pay phone. While an initial check-in call was made to assure our parents we'd arrived safely, an additional check-in call immediately signaled to Mom that we needed to be rescued. 

Mom made it clear that she was always happy to take the blame if we needed an out.  We always carried a quarter with us in case we needed to use a pay phone. We even had a plan for making collect calls if we lost or forgot the quarter. As a teen, I loved knowing I could use my parent's as scapegoats. 

When my mom was a young girl growing up in New York City, she carried a dime with her. Hubby and I used the Signal system with our boys, as well. They carried 45 cents until they were old enough for cell phones. 

I'm glad The Signal is catching on. It truly is an excellent safety net. I know, because I'm 100 percent sure it is an old, tried and true system that dates back to at least the early 1950s.

Micki Bare, mother of three, wife, daughter & writer is the author of Thurston T. Turtle children's books and aspiring novelist. 
Email: mickibare (at) gmail.com
Connect with Micki on Google+
Like Thurston T. Turtle on Facebook
Follow Micki on Twitter: @TurtleAuthor
View Micki's pics on Instagram @mickibare
Chat with micki_bare on SnapChat
Writing Samples



Copyright 2017 Michele Bare