Friday, September 26, 2014

Pumpkin Breakfast


Pumpkin Cooking | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Add pumpkin to just about anything
for tasty, healthy, autumn cuisine.
It's that time of year during which pumpkin puree is combined with most anything to give snacks, beverages, and meals an autumn flair. I do not mind this pumpkin craze, because for a month or two, I can add a healthy ingredient to indulgent foods and my family excitedly devours the festive cuisine. If I simply announced I added antioxidants, B-complex vitamins, calcium, potassium, and fiber to my famous, buttery biscuits, my family would suddenly be too busy for the most important meal of the day. But when they smell the aroma of pumpkin biscuits wafting throughout the house, and then enter the dining room and see a plate of festively orange, soft, fluffy biscuits, they grab a plate and sit for a few minutes.

One can of pumpkin puree not only provides our family enough pumpkin for a pile of pumpkin biscuits, but also for a batch of pecan pumpkin pancakes. 

Pumpkin Biscuits
2 cups self-rising flour
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1 stick softened butter
1/3 cup milk
3/4 cup pumpkin puree
3 tablespoons honey
1/2 a stick of melted butter to brush over biscuits before and after baking

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
450-degree oven | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare

Combine the flour, nutmeg, cinnamon, and ginger in a bowl. 
Spices and Flour | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare

Using a fork, cut in the softened butter until the mixture resembles small pea gravel. 
Butter in Flour | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare

Make a hole in the center of the dry ingredients.
Combine the milk, pumpkin puree, and honey. 
Milk Pumpkin Honey | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare

Add the milk mixture to the hole in the middle of the dry mixture all at once. 
Blending Wet & Dry Ingredients | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare

Thoroughly mix everything together by hand.
Turn the mixture out onto a well floured surface. Knead a few times with floured hands. It may be a bit goopy at first. That's okay, it should be. 
Pat out or roll out the dough to about 1/2-inch thick. 
Cut your biscuits. You can use a biscuit cutter, a drinking glass, cookie cutters, or anything shaped the way you want your biscuits shaped. Just generously flour whatever you use to cut them out.
Cutting Out Biscuits | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare

Arrange the biscuits next to each other on a baking sheet or stone. They should be touching.
Brush the biscuits with melted butter. 
Brushing Butter | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare

Bake on the top rack at 450 degrees until the biscuits rise and edges become golden brown. This can take 10 to 25 minutes depending on the size of your biscuits and the type of oven.
Remove from oven, brush with melted butter again.
Brush Again After Baking | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare

Let the biscuits sit on the stone or pan for about 10 minutes before serving.
Pumpkin Biscuits | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare


You will have leftover pumpkin puree. Use it to make pecan pumpkin pancakes the next day or, if you have a big crowd, in addition to the biscuits. For that recipe, CLICK HERE to visit The Courier-Tribune online, where it was published on September 26, 2014.


Micki Bare, mother of three, wife, daughter & writer is the author of Thurston T. Turtle children's books. 
Email: mickibare (at) gmail.com
Connect with Micki on Google+
Like Thurston T. Turtle on Facebook
Follow Micki on Twitter: @TurtleAuthor
View Micki's pics on Instagram @mickibare
Copyright 2014 Michele Bare 

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Interplanetary Traffic & Parking Considerations


With a Mars Rover preparing to head to our neighboring planet in 2020, we really should discuss the elephants in the room: Traffic and Parking. 
Landing Rovers | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Image via wikipedia.org


These are important issues. NASA is working on determining where to land another Mars Rover. They sought input from scientists around the world. Our world. 

Someday, another planet's space program might want to land a data-gathering rover on Earth. While they will probably consult their own scientists, input from Earthlings could only make landing here less stressful for our galactic neighbors. That is why I put together my top five list, in no particular order, of considerations for dealing with traffic and parking on Earth:

1. HOLIDAYS
Any alien visitor will want a full calendar of Earthly holidays. Why? Have you ever tried to park at the mall during the month of December? Or try to get home for Thanksgiving? All religious holidays from every denomination of every world religion must be listed as well as all national holidays from the nearly 200 countries established on Earth. These observances and celebrations have a tendency to increase traffic and absorb all parking spaces everywhere for extended periods of time.

2. RUSH HOUR
Aliens must consider the working habits of Earthlings. Even small towns, like Asheboro, have congested roadways before and after typical workdays. If I go out of my way to avoid Salisbury Street, Fayetteville Street, and Dixie Drive for large blocks of time during the work week, space aliens just might want to avoid the same for their rovers.

3. POPULATION
Outgoing Atlanta Traffic | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Do we really want THIS to be the
first image sent back to another
planet via their Earth Rover?
There are places on Earth that experience traffic congestion as well as lack of parking regardless of the day or time. In the US, Atlanta, Los Angeles, New York City, and Washington DC come to mind. I'm sure the same is true of other bigs cities, such as London, Paris, Beijing, Delhi, Moscow, and Buenos Aires. These are all places I would rather use public transportation than try to drive around and have to park my car, let alone a rover.

4. SCHOOL ZONES
Space aliens sending rovers will want to know where the zones are and when laws are in effect. Imagine their surprise when they land their data-gathering vehicle and expect to move it from point A to point B at 75 m.p.h. (converted to Earth speeds) at 3:15 p.m. near Plainville Township Elementary? All their calculations will have to be refigured because of the 25 m.p.h. speed limit in effect until 4:20 p.m. This, in turn, could throw off the entire mission. Also, no one wants Bernie's little two-year-old brother to grab parts of a high-tech rover and start putting them in his mouth and slobbering all over them while Bernie's mom is talking to his teacher about missing spelling homework.

5. CONSTRUCTION
Our need to continuously fix, upgrade, widen, and otherwise improve roadways is bound to have an impact. Once other life forms from distant galaxies receive data on all the construction zone alerts that are active on any given day all over our planet, they might actually be deterred from sending a rover. Eureka! Now that I think about it, maybe the governments of Earth already know construction zones are a deterrent to space aliens. Maybe that is precisely why there are so many active construction projects all over the world all the time. 


Micki Bare, mother of three, wife, daughter & writer is the author of Thurston T. Turtle children's books. 
Email: mickibare (at) gmail.com
Connect with Micki on Google+
Like Thurston T. Turtle on Facebook
Follow Micki on Twitter: @TurtleAuthor
View Micki's pics on Instagram @mickibare
Copyright 2014 Michele Bare 

Monday, September 8, 2014

The Caregiver Child: a poem by Micki Bare


The Caregiver Child
Stormy Life, Beautiful Life | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
Storms bring out the
beauty in nature;

as well as in life. 


Please be patient with me today,
I might not know quite what to say.
Life’s path just turned and in the road,
For us was perched an awkward, heavy load.

To others it might not seem so bad.
She seems the same, why feel so sad?
But there are symptoms they cannot see.
Ones that destroy what used to be.

She is peppy, active, fun, and sweet,
A gal any and all would love to meet.
But just behind the veil of the norm,
Rages a windy, dark, and treacherous storm.

Not all of us can be by her side.
Not everyone is meant to take this ride.
But each has her duty and his role to play,
Regardless of how near or far away.

I do not have to be the only soul,
To bear the full burden and absorb the toll.
Cheer her up with a call or two,
Slip a handwritten note in the mail from you.

For me, what would help more than you know,
On this path underneath descending shadow,
Is patience with my jumbled thoughts and ideas,
That come out wrong or seem unclear.

With this disease, so little is known,
Into an uncharted sea we’ve all been thrown.
It’s as hard for you as it is for mom and me,
Of course I know that; of course, I can see.

As we move forward together into tomorrow,
And face, with strength, each triumph and sorrow,
Patience and understanding will brace our climb,
And we will navigate this journey with grace and sublime.

***

Enjoy Every Moment | Navigating Hectivity by Micki Bare
How to take on AD? Together.
Just take it by the horns and every
moment you have a chance, enjoy.
On October 18, my mom and I, along with family members, friends, and neighbors, will be walking in the 2014 Memory Walk to raise money for Alzheimer's Disease research and outreach. To sponsor our team, Ella's Gang, please click on this link: 









Micki Bare, mother of three, wife, daughter & writer is the author of Thurston T. Turtle children's books. 
Email: mickibare (at) gmail.com
Connect with Micki on Google+
Like Thurston T. Turtle on Facebook
Follow Micki on Twitter: @TurtleAuthor
View Micki's pics on Instagram @mickibare
Copyright 2014 Michele Bare